no-knead honey whole wheat bread

no-knead honey whole wheat bread | The Clever Carrot

The internet is a beautiful thing.

Back when I posted my recipe for no-knead artisan bread, I made a new friend on facebook. Her name is Hendrika, and she is from the Netherlands.

Hendrika (also a baker) recommended making a whole grain version. She said to replace 25% of the flour with whole grain flour, and increase it up to 50% for a heartier bread. Then roll the dough in old fashioned oats before the second rise.

I took her suggestion…

no-knead honey whole wheat bread | The Clever Carrot

And it worked beautifully! I even added a little honey for a hint of sweetness.

What’s great about this recipe, is that it’s made in the exact same fashion as the original no-knead bread (who doesn’t love baking in a dutch oven?!) The only difference is the ingredients.

I went with a smaller amount of whole wheat flour as I prefer a lighter, less dense bread. However, I’ve made it using a 50/50 ratio and it was just as good- it’s simply a matter of personal taste. I also added a touch more salt to enhance the flavor. The result was a nutty, golden bread bread with a soft and chewy interior. The crust was perfectly crisp.

no-knead honey whole wheat bread | The Clever Carrot

And that is the beauty of the internet. It brings together like minded people.

As for us, we’ve been enjoying the fruits of my labor in sandwiches, french toast and dunking in soup. The kids go crazy for this bread. Any leftovers are blitzed into breadcrumbs and stashed away in the freezer. As I’ve mentioned before, there’s nothing like making your own bread and once you get started the possibilities are endless. Thanks Hendrika, for the fabulous idea!

For a step-by-step tutorial on making no-knead artisan bread, click here!

*It’s interesting to note that this dough is not as wet as the original version. Whole wheat flour absorbs more water resulting in a drier dough. Keep in mind that you might need to add additional water to bring the dough together. Do this 1 tablespoon at a time until you reach your desired consistency.

5.0 from 1 reviews

no-knead honey whole wheat bread
 
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Ingredients
  • 2¼ c. bread flour (not all-purpose) + more for dusting
  • ¾ c. whole wheat flour
  • ¼ teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1½ teaspoons sea salt
  • 2 tbsp. honey
  • 1½ c. water
  • ¾ c. old fashioned oats, for rolling
  • 6 quart dutch oven
* I used King Arthur bread & whole wheat flour and SAF instant yeast.
* You can use any 6 quart dutch oven, cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic bakeware (with lid) that can heat up to 500 degrees F.
Instructions
  1. Make the dough: In a large bowl whisk the bread flour, whole wheat flour, yeast and salt. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and water. Add the water mixture to the dry ingredients, and stir until combined; dough will be wet and sticky, with a shaggy appearance. If your dough seems very dry, add more water (do this 1 tablespoon at a time) until desired consistency is achieved.
  2. Transfer dough to a lightly oiled container and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest for 14 hours- overnight, at room temperature (about 70 degrees). Your dough is ready when it has puffed up in volume, about 1½ -2x its original size. The surface will be dotted with bubbles. *See note below.
  3. Shape the dough: Lightly flour a sheet of parchment paper and place the dough on top. Fold the dough in half (like a book) and then fold it in half again. The direction doesn’t matter. You’re doing this to release some of the air inside, and to make it easier to toll into a ball.
  4. Add more flour to the parchment paper (be generous so that it doesn’t stick) and sprinkle the oats on top of the paper. Shape the dough into a ball by tucking the sides underneath itself, and then roll around in the oats to coat. Place the dough (seam side down) onto the paper. Cover loosely with oiled plastic wrap and let rest again until puffy in shape. This will take 30 minutes- 2 hours depending on how warm your kitchen is.
  5. At least a half-hour before the dough is ready, preheat your oven to 400 F. Put a (6 quart) dutch oven pot inside for 20 minutes. When the dough is ready, carefully remove pot from the oven. Slide your hand underneath the parchment paper and invert the dough into the pot. The seam will be facing up. It will look messy, but the top will be beautifully cracked when baked. Using oven mitts, shake pan once or twice if the dough is unevenly distributed.
  6. Bake the dough: Place your bread into the oven, and immediately reduce the temperature from 400 to 375 F.Cover with the lid and bake for 30 minutes. If you find that your bread is browning too quickly, reduce the temperature to 350 F. Remove the lid and bake for an additional 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown.
  7. To make sure that the bread is completely cooked through, take its temperature. Carefully tip the bread onto its side and insert a thermometer into the bottom. It should read 200-205 F. If not, place it back into the oven until it is ready (extra time in bread baking is a good thing). If you’re worried about the top getting too brown, put the lid back on.
  8. When your bread is ready, transfer to a wire rack to cool. It should feel light and make a hollow sound when you give it a knock underneath. Let it cool for at least 1 hour. Cutting it too soon might ruin the texture resulting in a gummy crumb!
Notes
* If your dough isn’t puffed and bubbly after the initial rise, place it in the microwave with the light on (keeping the door ajar). The warmth from the light will give the yeast a boost. My friend Celia gave me this tip and it works like a charm, especially in chilly kitchens!

Comments

  1. says

    This is a beautiful loaf of bread and I imagine your kitchen smelled heavenly while it baked! No knead bread was designed with me in mind…assuming I can make peace with yeast. :) I’ll be giving this a try soon!

    • Emilie says

      Hi there Wendy! Oh, yes! The kitchen smelled quite delicious :) The no-knead approach is really great, especially for beginners. I hope you find the step-by-step tutorial helpful (found in the original no-knead artisan bread recipe). If you have any questions, I’m here to help :)

  2. says

    HI Emilie… Thanks for dropping by. I have to say your recipe worked beautifully. How satisfying it is to bake one’s own bread?! I have to say I never dared before but you made it simple:) I lobe your blog and i will always drop in to get inspired:)

  3. Rebecca Duckworth says

    Was there a typo? Only 1/4 teaspoon of yeast? Surely there is more yeast than that; I’ve been baking bread for some time now and never seen a recipe with so little yeast.

    • Emilie says

      Hi Rebecca!

      Nope! Not a typo… 1/4 tsp. is correct ;)
      .
      This recipe is an adaptation of Jim Lahey’s No-Knead Bread. See this link: http://www.sullivanstreetbakery.com/recipes
      I posted a version as well: http://www.theclevercarrot.com/2013/03/no-knead-artisan-bread/

      He uses a small amount of yeast to achieve a ‘slow rise.’ Using a larger quantity would speed up the fermentation process, thus making the rise time considerably shorter (which is probably what you’re used to). This shorter rise time would yield different results than his original recipe.

      I’ve made this bread a million times, and it totally works! I hope this all makes sense! I’d be happy to answer any other questions that you might have :)

  4. Lea.Ann says

    if not all purpose flour then what kind is it ? I always use it for everything. some people say cake flour too but i use only the all purpose? what kind do u call cake or bread flour? brand name if you will please?

    • Emilie says

      Hi there! I use bread flour (it’s listed under ‘ingredients’ in the recipe above). The brand that I use varies; King Arthur or Gold Medal.

      I prefer bread flour to all purpose, as it has more gluten in it giving it more structure, different crumb composition, and chewiness. I’m sure you could sub with all purpose flour, the results will be different. I’ve never used cake flour in bread baking. Hope this helps! If you have any other questions, please let me know!! :)

  5. Paul Stretch says

    Emilie,
    I found your bread recipe this evening and decided to make it. The trouble is I don’t have a Dutch Oven so will use a 10″ cast iron skillet and a baking dish full of water. I think I’ll start at 500 for 10 minutes then 375 for 40 minutes.

    Rather than the microwave, I use my oven instead with the light. Works the same, I use the oven all the time when I make bread really speeds the rising when you use yeast.
    I put together a healthy soda bread that I cook in a 8″ cast iron skillet. It takes 20 minutes to prepare and 50 minutes in the oven. Done. I am sending you the recipe if you would like to try it. I’ll let you know how the bread turns out.

    Paul’s Skillet Oatmeal Yogurt Soda Bread
    2 C w/w flour
    1/2 C wheat bran ( no bran use 1/2 C A/P flour , 1/2 C w/w flour or oatmeal )
    1/2 C old fashion oatmeal
    1 C A/P flour
    2 TBS glutton
    1 tps sea salt
    1TBS baking powder
    1 tps baking soda
    1 TBS brown sugar

    1 C plain yogurt
    1/2 C buttermilk
    1/4 C olive oil
    1/4 C honey
    2 TBS melted butter (opt )

    1. Turn oven to 375 degrees.
    2. Mix all dry ingredients in medium bowl.
    3. Mix all wet ingredients in small bowl.
    4. Combine ingredients mix with wooden spoon until flour leaves side
    of bowl and no dry indredients. Kneed 3 or 4 times in bowl to combine.
    5. Put mix in a 8″ cast irion skillet.
    6. Bake in oven for 45-50 min.
    7. Cool on wire rack for 30 min.

    Thank you,
    Paul Stretch

  6. Bread baker says

    THIS IS AMAZING!! I have been experimenting with no knead cast iron bread for a few weeks. This recipe is the best, by far, of any I have made. Thank you!! Love your website!

    • Emilie says

      Hi there! Isn’t it great baking with cast iron? It’s like your own professional oven and the results are fantastic. So glad you liked the recipe! Thanks for stopping by :)

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