15 minute meals: simple italian pasta

15 minute meals: simple italian pasta | theclevercarrot.com

Ever wonder what’s going on at the bottom of your fridge drawer?

You know, where the flimsy carrots and celery hang out?

Mine is a mess. Always. And for some reason I think it’s OK to keep jamming stuff in there until the drawer dislodges from the hinge (those things are junk anyway). Then, on the rare occasion that I’m feeling particularly inspired, I clean said drawer.

Oh look… ginger! A sweet potato! A cheese stick! Mold!

It should have its own zip code….

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how to revive wilted herbs

how to revive wilted herbs | The Clever Carrot

I have a horrible habit.

Whenever I buy herbs, I just rip off whatever I need and throw it back in the fridge. I should be taking the time to store them properly, but I just don’t for some reason. And this is coming from the girl who can’t stand waste! I will however, remember to regularly feed my sourdough starter (because that’s normal).

Then of course, everything wilts…

how to revive wilted herbs | The Clever Carrot

But luckily, there’s a really easy way to fix this.

Take your herbs (I’m using parsley) and cut off the stems. Remove and discard any bruised or damaged leaves. Make an ice bath for the leaves to soak.

Submerge.

how to revive wilted herbs | The Clever Carrothow to revive wilted herbs | The Clever Carrot

The cold water will shock the herbs back to life.

The amount of soaking time will vary, but you can usually tell when they’re ready. The herbs will gradually float to the top and look bright green and refreshed. It’s actually fun to watch them ‘grow.’ This particular bunch sat in there for about an hour which was probably longer then necessary, but I got distracted and forgot to check on them. Whatever you do, don’t let them soak for too long or else they will become water logged.

You can use this technique with other herbs such as basil, mint, chervil and cilantro.

how to revive wilted herbs | The Clever Carrot

Cool trick, right?

It’s nice to have something like this up your sleeve when you are a bit lax about your herbs. I also like the fact that most of the work is ‘hands off’ leaving you free to do other things while they soak. It will save you a couple of bucks in the long run too. Try it!

Tips:

  • Dry your picked herbs thoroughly with a clean kitchen towel or salad spinner (that’s what I do). Store them in an air-tight container lined with a paper towel on the top and bottom to absorb any extra moisture. You can also do this in a Ziploc bag. Use within a couple of days.
  • Basil can be a bit high maintenance to revive & store- if it’s exposed to cold water for too long, the leaves will turn black. My recommendation is to shock them (not soak) for 1-2 minutes, or just enough to perk them up. Pat dry and use right away. Washed basil does not keep very well. Get a plant ;)
how to revive wilted herbs
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1 bunch of wilted herbs
  • ice cubes
  • water
* This technique can be used with basil, mint, chervil and cilantro.
** Basil can be a bit high maintenance to revive & store- if it's exposed to cold water for too long, the leaves will turn black. Shock the leaves (not soak) for about 1-2 minutes, or just enough to perk them up. Pat dry and use right away. Washed basil does not keep very well. Get a plant ;)
Instructions
  1. Prepare an ice bath by filling a large bowl with cold water and ice.
  2. For the herbs, cut off the stems and remove any bruised, dry or damaged leaves.
  3. Submerge the picked herbs into the ice bath.
  4. Soak for about 15-30 minutes, or until they perk up and look refreshed.
  5. Drain the herbs in a colander.
  6. Dry thoroughly with a clean kitchen towel or salad spinner.
  7. To store, place the herbs in an air-tight container lined with a paper towel on the top and bottom to absorb any extra moisture. You can also do this in a Ziploc bag. Use within a couple of days.